Tag Archives: infrared

Online Classes for August 2014

Digital Infrared Processing with Lightroom and Photoshop

Wednesday, August 20th 9-11am Mountain Time (UTC -7)

Learn to process digital infrared images in Lightroom and Photoshop

Learn to process digital infrared images in Lightroom and Photoshop and create a wide range of styles with plug-ins and other tools.

Raw processing with Lightroom

Sunday, August 24th 9am-1pm Mountain Time (UTC -7) 

Master the Lightroom Develop module for processing your fine-art photos.

This is my complete hands-on course for the Lightroom 5 Develop Module. We’ll go through the fundamentals of processing images in Lightroom 5, including workflow order, global adjustments, local adjustments, and image sharpening.

See all my classes and field workshops here.

Digital Infrared: One Camera, Multiple Looks

Odell_20140612_3050-2

You can have a lot of creative fun with a digital infrared camera. Converting an old camera to infrared is a great way to breathe new life into that camera. I recently purchased a used Fujifilm X-E1 mirrorless camera to use as an infrared body. I chose this camera as a compact complement to my Fujifilm X-T1, which has become my primary travel camera due to its small size and excellent image quality. I don’t want to carry multiple systems in the field, so I figured the X-E1 should do the trick (and it does). I’ll have more on that in another post. The toughest decision about infrared conversion, is choosing the conversion type. Depending on your style of shooting and subject matter, you can choose from a range of conversions, including standard, enhanced color, super color, deep black, and even full-spectrum (UV through IR range). Each of these conversions has its own merits, but most people will probably want to use either standard (720nm) or super-color (590nm) for infrared work. Continue reading Digital Infrared: One Camera, Multiple Looks

Channel-Swapping: Download Free Photoshop Actions

Independence Pass, Colorado. Digital Infrared image captured with a Nikon 1 V1 camera 590nm conversion.
Independence Pass, Colorado. Digital Infrared image captured with a Nikon 1 V1 camera 590nm conversion. Blue-sky effect created by Lab channel swapping in Photoshop CS6.

In yesterday’s post about channel-swapping, I mentioned two techniques for Adobe Photoshop. I created actions for both the RGB channel-swap (red-blue) and Lab channel swap (a-b).

Download this action set here (ZIP archive): Infrared Actions

Swap Meet! Creating the Blue-Sky Effect on Infrared Images

"Stargate"  Penrose Fountain, Colorado Springs, CO. Nikon 1 V1 590nm (super-color) infrared image.
“Stargate”
Penrose Fountain, Colorado Springs, CO. Nikon 1 V1 590nm (super-color) infrared image.

Although infrared cameras capture little or no visible light, you still produce a color image in your camera. You can get creative with these colors depending on the type of conversion you have and your software. One favorite technique is the “blue-sky” effect. In this post, I’ll explore a couple of ways you can create this effect with different software packages.

Continue reading Swap Meet! Creating the Blue-Sky Effect on Infrared Images

My Descent into Infrared Photography, Part 3: One Camera, Multiple Looks

Old building, Ashcroft mining town. Super-color infrared image processed to produce "deep black" style.
Old building, Ashcroft mining town. Super-color infrared image processed to produce “deep black” style. With the right tools, you can create many infrared styles from a super-color infrared conversion (590nm).

I’ve been taking lots of infrared images with my converted Nikon 1 V1 camera. It’s not just because I think infrared is cool, but there is a method to the madness. Any time you get a new piece of gear, whether it’s a lens, camera, or accessory, you need to learn it. That means spending some serious time to learn the strengths and weaknesses of your gear. With an infrared camera, I not only need to understand how the camera itself operates, but also how to best process images to get the creative results I desire. Continue reading My Descent into Infrared Photography, Part 3: One Camera, Multiple Looks