Category Archives: Videos

Think Globally, Act Locally (With Video Tutorial)

Turquoise Lake, CO. This image is a great example of how local adjustments will serve you better in post-processing. I enhanced the foreground rocks without affecting the smoothness of the water and background elements by applying Clarity via the Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 5.
Turquoise Lake, CO. This image is a great example of how local adjustments will serve you better in post-processing. I enhanced the foreground rocks without affecting the smoothness of the water and background elements by applying Clarity via the Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 5.

When it comes to post-processing your images, we’ve got a ton of tools to work with, both in our RAW editors and in plug-ins. Sometimes, though, I’ll see images that just look completely over-done. Usually this occurs when the photographer sees an effect and cranks it up really high. But the problem is bigger than that. Often, we’ll create images that have regions that look great with a particular effect, but at the expense of other areas. This is what happens when you apply adjustments globally (to the entire image).

The majority of adjustment tools operate globally; contrast, saturation, sharpening, etc. While we need to make global adjustments to set the foundation of our image, some adjustments can wreak havoc when applied globally. A good example is the Clarity slider in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. This slider affects local contrast (textures) and is extremely powerful. It’s also a tool that can quickly get out of hand. While certain features look great with added Clarity, other areas of the image can start to look extra-terrestrial.

The solution for these types of images is to place specific adjustments only where you need them. I like to use the Clarity slider to examine my image for areas that would benefit from its application, but then I’ll add the effect with the brush tool in Lightroom. The same technique applies to Photoshop users, who can use selection masks to add effects subtly to specific areas of their image.

Here’s a short video I made that illustrates the “Think Globally, Act Locally” paradigm for digital photographers.

[youtube_sc url=”http://youtu.be/NFv3zEgKFGU” title=”Digital%20photography%20tips%20with%20Jason%20P.%20Odell” fs=”1″]

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Video: Setting up Long Exposures with ND Filters

[youtube_sc url=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbqVHuloHGo” title=”Long%20Exposures%20in%20Digital%20Photography” autohide=”1″]

Here’s a tutorial video showing how I use solid ND filters to capture long exposures in daylight conditions. A couple of key points for long exposures:

  1. Focus and compose before attaching the filters to your lens
  2. Determine the base exposure shutter speed using Aperture-priority mode
  3. Close the eyepiece shutter or use the cover before you shoot
  4. Use Manual exposure and set the shutter speed to “bulb.”
  5. Calculate the long exposure and use a timer to get the exposure right
  6. Use a locking remote release so you don’t have to touch the camera during the exposure
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Setting White Balance on Infrared Images with Lightroom (with video)

Color infrared image captured with a Nikon D700 and processed in Lightroom 5 and Adobe Photoshop CS6.
Color infrared image captured with a Nikon D700 and processed in Lightroom 5 and Adobe Photoshop CS6.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom does not handle RAW images captured with an infrared (IR) converted camera well by default. The problem lies in the white balance settings, which can be a real challenge to get right. However, you can work around this problem by creating a custom camera calibration profile using Adobe’s DNG Profile Editor software. The custom profile will let you have the necessary latitude to correct the WB setting in your IR images for further processing.

Here’s the whole process explained in a brief video that I put together:

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Continue reading Setting White Balance on Infrared Images with Lightroom (with video)

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Understanding the Camera Calibration Module in Lightroom

[youtube_sc url=”http://youtu.be/HK7Hgu-I4i8″ title=”Adobe%20Photoshop%20Lightroom%20Camera%20Calibration” modestbranding=”1″ autohide=”1″ fs=”1″]

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom relies on the Adobe Camera RAW (ACR) rendering engine to convert camera RAW images. The default color and contrast settings are something called “Adobe Standard” which look different than what you might see on your camera LCD when reviewing your images. However, Adobe offers alternate Camera Profiles which emulate the as-shot settings from many Nikon and Canon DSLRs. You’ll find these settings in the Camera Calibration panel in Lightroom and ACR.

In this example, I have placed an image of a Colorchecker card on the screen so you can see how the colors and contrast change between camera profiles. For this image, I get options based on the Nikon D800 that I used to capture the RAW file. Note that you can only make profile changes to RAW files. If you see “Embedded” under the profile option, it’s because you’re looking at a TIFF or JPEG image in Lightroom. Choose from any of the profile presets in the drop-down menu to change the baseline color and tone curve of your image, and you can fine-tune it with the sliders if you wish.

If you have a ColorChecker card, you can use the ColorChecker software from X-rite to create a custom profile for your camera. Each custom profile is specific to the camera you use to create the image. You can further tweak those profiles using Adobe’s DNG Profile Editor software (free download from www.adobe.com).

Once you have a profile that you like, you might wish to change your defaults to always use that profile going forward. If you do change your default settings, note that ANYTHING you modified in the Develop section gets applied, so keep your adjustments minimal (Calibration, sharpening, lens corrections) so that you don’t over-process your images. Defaults are only applied automatically when you import new images into Lightroom. Existing images will not be changed; you’ll have to adjust them manually or use the “Reset Settings” option in Lightroom to do so.

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What Can Photographers Learn From Rembrandt?

Rembrandt’s classic painting, The Night Watch, uses light to identify the main figures of interest.

Not everyone (myself included) has a degree in fine art or has studied art extensively. As such, I find it enjoyable to take a look at classic paintings and see what makes them so effective. One such example is Rembrandt’s “The Night Watch.” If you examine this image, you’ll see that Rembrandt uses light and color to emphasize the important subjects in his painting. Note that the two primary figures are well-lit, but so is the smaller girl in the background. The other characters in this scene are not as bright and colorful as the ones Rembrandt wants us to focus on.

We can use the same technique in our digital photography. Studio photographers use well-positioned lights all the time to achieve this effect. However, if you’re an outdoor photographer, you might not always get the kind of lighting conditions that perfectly illuminate your subject. Continue reading What Can Photographers Learn From Rembrandt?

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