Tag Archives: landscape photography

Long Exposure Photographs Are Simply Amazing

long exposure photographs
Use a long exposure to dramtically transform your scene from a snapshot to a work of art.

If you’re looking to transform your images from snapshots into stunning creative photos, try experimenting with long exposure photographs. All you need is a camera that supports bulb exposure mode,  a tripod, and in some cases a dark filter. In twilight conditions, long exposure photographs are pretty easy. Set your lens aperture to f/16 or f/22 and then set your camera’s ISO value to its the lowest possible setting.

To capture long exposure photographs during the day, you’ll need to add a dark filter to your lens. These filters, called a solid neutral density filters, enable you to capture a long exposure photograph during the day. In either case, keep in mind that you’ll need a solid tripod to make a long exposure photograph.

How Long Exposure Photographs Transform Your Images

Here are just a few ways how a long exposure photograph delivers maximum impact, especially in places that are popular with photographers. Use a long exposure and deliver dynamic images with the “wow” factor you can’t capture with a snapshot. Continue reading Long Exposure Photographs Are Simply Amazing

Fall Safaris Are Go!

Join me in South Dakota to photograph the beauty of the Badlands

I’m pleased to announce that my fall instructional photo safaris to South Dakota and the Oregon Coast are moving forward as planned!

I have a handful of openings for these upcoming trips:

  • South Dakota Badlands: Sept. 17-21 (RSVP by August 15th)
    Get Tickets
  • Oregon Coast (Bandon Beach): Oct. 3-8 (RSVP by Sept. 1)
    Get Tickets
  • White Sands, New Mexico: November 1-4 (RSVP by Oct 1)
    Get Tickets

These safaris are limited to eight (8) photographers, and include field and classroom instruction, post-processing sessions, and image critique.

Full Schedule Here

South Dakota Photo Safari 2017

Photograph Surreal Landscapes Sept. 17-21

Registration for my annual South Dakota Badlands instructional photo safari closes on August 1st. Space is limited to eight (8) photographers. On this trip, you’ll not only be treated to some of the most interesting landscapes in the US, but you’ll also receive personal field and processing instruction from me. This is one of my most popular landscape photo safaris, and you’ll learn my end to end approach to photography, from camera to post-processing.

Discounted lodging is available when you register by August 1st.

Focus-Stacking Landscape Photos

Focus Stacking: Infinite depth of field and maximum sharpness without a tilt-shift lens

Get infinite depth of field in landscape photographs with focus-stacking
Get infinite depth of field in landscape photographs with focus-stacking

Focus-stacking is a technique that macro photographers have used for years to maximize depth of field in close-up images. You can apply the same technique to landscape photos, too. While dedicated focus-stacking software has been around for a long time, this tool is now built-in to Adobe Photoshop CC (you just have to know where to find it). That means if you have the Adobe Photography subscription package, you can start experimenting with focus-stacking right away.

Free Download: Focus Stacking Guide (PDF)

I’ve put together a FREE focus stacking guide (PDF eBook) that you can download for free. Simply add the item to your cart and proceed to free checkout. The file will be delivered to you via email.

My focus stacking guide  will show you how to:
  • Capture focus-stacks
  • Process RAW images in Adobe Lightroom
  • Merge and mask the stacked images automatically in Photoshop CC

Download Jason Odell’s Focus Stacking Guide
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Before & After With Lightroom 5

During yesterday’s “Mastering the Lightroom 5 Develop Module” online class, we took a look at the power of RAW editing by working on an image that might not have been too inspiring straight out of the camera:

Sunset in the Badlands; as-shot image before processing.
Sunset in the Badlands; as-shot image before processing.

What I liked about the shot, though, was the light hitting the peaks and the clouds. This image represents a typical set of challenges in outdoor photography. Wide dynamic range between the sky and the foreground, mixed lighting between the sky (daylight) and the hills (shade), and low contrast overall.

We used the full set of tools in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 to adjust the RAW image, and then we applied Skylight Filter and Pro Contrast in Color Efex Pro 4 to make the final image pop. The end result is far more spectacular, and captures the feeling we had when we were actually there shooting this on the Badlands Photo Safari.

Sunset in the Badlands, South Dakota. Final image after processing in Lightroom 5 and Color Efex Pro 4.
Sunset in the Badlands, South Dakota. Final image after processing in Lightroom 5 and Color Efex Pro 4.