Tag Archives: gear

The L-Bracket

Why Your Camera Needs an L-Bracket

L-bracket
The L-bracket is a must-have accessory for tripod photography.

I always mount an L-bracket on my DSLR cameras. These Arca-Swiss compatible plates have a bottom and a side dovetail plate that attaches to a clamp on your tripod head. While these brackets cost more than a simple bottom plate, L-brackets are extremely useful for landscape and portrait photographers.

L-Brackets attach your camera to a tripod head via a dovetail plate (Arca-Swiss System). Most quick-release plates mount to the bottom of your camera via the tripod mounting screw. With standard plates, you have to “flop” the camera on its side using your tripod head if you want to shoot vertical (portrait) orientation. With an L-bracket, you simply detach the camera from the QR clamp, and then re-mount it on its side. If you use a tripod head with a lever-release clamp, then this process is quick and easy. Continue reading The L-Bracket

First Impressions of the Nikon 8-15mm Fisheye Zoom Nikkor

A fun fisheye zoom that will spark your creativity… just be careful not to photograph your feet!

The Nikon 8-15mm Fisheye zoom Nikkor is a fun way to get creative with your photos.

I received a production copy of the new Nikon 8-15mm f/3.5-4.5 E ED Fisheye Nikkor from B&H Photo to test and review.

I’m still playing around with this lens, but so far, it’s been fun! At 8mm, you get a circular fisheye with a whopping 180° angle of view when you mount this lens on a FX-format Nikon DSLR. Point this lens straight up and you will get subjects both in front of you and behind you in the frame! Yep, you’ll want to be careful of getting your feet or tripod legs in the shot with this lens. Continue reading First Impressions of the Nikon 8-15mm Fisheye Zoom Nikkor

Nikon D850 Speculation Thread

Coming soon: Nikon D850

Yesterday, Nikon announced that development is underway for the long-awaited successor to the wildly popular D810 FX DSLR, the Nikon D850.

Other than a beautifully produced time-lapse video and the mention of 8k video capability, details on the new D850 were particularly vague:

“The D850 will exceed the expectations of the vast range of photographers that seek the high resolution and high-speed capabilities that only a Nikon of this caliber complemented by NIKKOR lenses can offer.” — Nikon D850 Press Release

So, we’re left to speculate on what exactly the Nikon D850 will deliver in terms of specifications. Right now, the D810 is essentially the finest Nikon camera I’ve used, but there are a few features that I’d like to see improved. After using the D810 for the last three years and recently using the D500, here’s what I’d really like to see in the D810 successor: Continue reading Nikon D850 Speculation Thread

The Ultimate Nikon Birding Kit

Crested Caracara, South Texas. Photographed with a Nikon D500 and 300mm f/2.8 AFS VRII Nikkor lens. The fast autofocus and frame rate of the D500 really came through!

You probably know I enjoy photographing birds whenever I can get the chance. Over the years, I’ve used lots of different Nikon cameras, and I have to say that we’re living in good times if birding is your thing. After a year with the Nikon D500, I can honestly say that I’ve not run into a better birding camera from Nikon. The autofocus is deadly fast, the camera delivers 10fps RAW, and you can shoot 200 continuous frames when you use a fast QXD memory card. I’ve also had the chance to test a variety of Nikon lenses on my birding safaris, so here’s my current recommendations for anyone looking to maximize their Nikon birding experience.  Continue reading The Ultimate Nikon Birding Kit

Nikon 105mm f/1.4E vs. 105mm f/2.8 AFS G VR Macro

As you may know, I’m testing the new Nikon 105mm f/1.4E ED Nikkor portrait lens. One of the main questions I’ve been asked over on my Facebook page is, “how does it compare to the 105mm micro-Nikkor?”

It’s a fair question, as I’ve long listed the 105mm f/2.8 AFS G VR micro-Nikkor as an excellent portrait lens. For this purpose, at least to me, there are really only two discriminators: VR (stabilization) and aperture.  Continue reading Nikon 105mm f/1.4E vs. 105mm f/2.8 AFS G VR Macro