Category Archives: Tips and Tricks

The Ultimate Nikon Birding Kit

Crested Caracara, South Texas. Photographed with a Nikon D500 and 300mm f/2.8 AFS VRII Nikkor lens. The fast autofocus and frame rate of the D500 really came through!

You probably know I enjoy photographing birds whenever I can get the chance. Over the years, I’ve used lots of different Nikon cameras, and I have to say that we’re living in good times if birding is your thing. After a year with the Nikon D500, I can honestly say that I’ve not run into a better birding camera from Nikon. The autofocus is deadly fast, the camera delivers 10fps RAW, and you can shoot 200 continuous frames when you use a fast QXD memory card. I’ve also had the chance to test a variety of Nikon lenses on my birding safaris, so here’s my current recommendations for anyone looking to maximize their Nikon birding experience.  Continue reading The Ultimate Nikon Birding Kit

Retina Macs: Setting Proper Screen Resolution in Photoshop

If you’re using one of the new iMacs or MacBooks with Retina Display for Adobe Photoshop, you may have noticed that your images look very small when selecting, View–> Print Size.  That’s because the retina display has a MUCH higher resolution than the typical CRT or LCD monitor. Most displays have a screen resolution around 72 pixels per inch (ppi), which is far less than what you get with a retina display.

Get the fix here:
Continue reading Retina Macs: Setting Proper Screen Resolution in Photoshop

Get Maximum Dynamic Range from RAW Image Files with Lightroom

Did you know that with a little tweaking, you can extract tremendous dynamic range from single RAW files in Adobe Lightroom without using HDR? The trick is to take advantage of Lightroom’s Camera Calibration panel. There, you set the initial tone curve of your image (contrast & color). By using a low-contrast tone curve, you can recover more highlight and shadow details than by using sliders alone. If you use Nikon DSLRs, you can choose the “Camera Flat” profile to get more dynamic range. If you don’t have a Nikon camera, you can create your own custom profile with a linear tone curve by using the Adobe DNG Profile Editor. My video above will show you how.

Discover more Lightroom processing secrets with my comprehensive PDF guide.