Tag Archives: Photoshop

Lightroom CC Update: Dehaze Goes Local

Apply the Dehaze effect locally with brush and gradient tools in LR CC 2015.2 and ACR 9.2
Apply the Dehaze effect locally with brush and gradient tools in LR CC 2015.2 and ACR 9.2

Adobe rolled out updates to Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC early today. In addition to new camera/lens profiles, this update adds local Dehaze adjustments to the Develop Module (and ACR 9.2). You can now apply the Dehaze effects locally with brush and gradient tools.

I really like the Dehaze effect; it’s similar to clarity but the contrast adjustment isn’t quite as intense. You can also use it in the negative direction to create the appearance of fog/haze. It’s a tool that is particularly well-suited for enhancing night sky images of the Milky Way.

Adobe has also modified the Import dialog in LR, something I will investigate shortly. In the meantime, enjoy the new features. Note: the Dehaze feature is only available in Lightroom CC 2015 and will not appear in Lightroom 6.

Online Training: Process Infrared Images in Lightroom & Photoshop

Infrared image captured with a 590nm modified Fujifilm X-E1 camera and fisheye lens.
Infrared image captured with a 590nm modified Fujifilm X-E1 camera and fisheye lens.

Join me online next weekend as I teach digital infrared processing using Lightroom & Photoshop. Digital infrared photography is more accessible than ever, and it is a great way of exploring the world in a different light. In this class, I’ll teach you how you can create a variety of different looks with your digital infrared files using Lightroom, Photoshop, and Nik Plug-ins.

When: Saturday, February 21st
12-2pm Mountain Time (2-4pm Eastern)
Where: Online (GoToMeeting) webinar

Topics Include:

  • Choosing an infrared conversion filter type
  • Setting White Balance in Lightroom/ACR via a custom camera calibration
  • RAW adjustments in Lightroom/ACR
  • Fixing hotspots
  • Black and White Conversion using Silver Efex Pro 2
  • Red-Blue Channel Swap (blue sky) technique in Photoshop and via Plug-ins
  •  Working with super-color IR files to create a variety of styles

All participants will receive a printable PDF copy of the class materials.

To join this online session, please RSVP here by Friday, Feb. 20th.

RIP Capture NX: 2006-2014

cnx-grave
Capture NX is no longer supported by Nikon. It’s time to move on. Tombstone image used under creative commons license from Jo Naylor.
It was a good run, while it lasted.

Yesterday, Nikon released the final version of Capture NX-D, a free program that is essentially an OEM version of Silkypix. Although Capture NX2 still appears for sale on Nikon USA’s site, it’s unclear as to the way forward.

In case you missed my earlier review of the Capture NX-D beta, here are the salient points you need to know:  Continue reading RIP Capture NX: 2006-2014

Digital Infrared: One Camera, Multiple Looks

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You can have a lot of creative fun with a digital infrared camera. Converting an old camera to infrared is a great way to breathe new life into that camera. I recently purchased a used Fujifilm X-E1 mirrorless camera to use as an infrared body. I chose this camera as a compact complement to my Fujifilm X-T1, which has become my primary travel camera due to its small size and excellent image quality. I don’t want to carry multiple systems in the field, so I figured the X-E1 should do the trick (and it does). I’ll have more on that in another post. The toughest decision about infrared conversion, is choosing the conversion type. Depending on your style of shooting and subject matter, you can choose from a range of conversions, including standard, enhanced color, super color, deep black, and even full-spectrum (UV through IR range). Each of these conversions has its own merits, but most people will probably want to use either standard (720nm) or super-color (590nm) for infrared work. Continue reading Digital Infrared: One Camera, Multiple Looks

Making that older Mac Pro zippy

After a long wait, Apple has finally produced a new Mac Pro workstation. While these machines are no-doubt awesome, they are clearly designed for hard-core video production. They offer not only the fastest processors, but dual GPU graphics cards. The most significant feature of the new Mac Pros is its size. They are very small. Gone are any internal storage or expansion options. There is one internal drive, which is flash-based (SSD). There are no PCIe expansion ports. This machine is tiny, but it means you’ll need to utilize external storage options for your data; either via USB 3 or Thunderbolt (there are no eSATA ports on the new Mac Pro).

Despite delivering what I’m sure is a fantastic machine, I’m not quite ready to drop $3500-$4000 into a new computer and then have to spend additional money to migrate my existing internal drives into external enclosures. My 2010 Mac Pro is a robust machine, and one reason why I got it was its expansion options. I’m able to add PCI cards and more memory into my existing machine. With that in mind, here are a few upgrades I did that significantly improved my overall computing experience using Lightroom and Photoshop. Continue reading Making that older Mac Pro zippy