Tag Archives: Photoshop

Photoshop Panels Expansion Pack Released

The Panel Effects Expansion Pack includes 25 new panel templates

I’m pleased to announce the immediate release of 25 additional panel templates for use with Adobe Photoshop. Use these unique designs to create even more panel/triptych effects with your favorite photos!

Download the Photoshop Panels Expansion Pack

$7.99 Add to Cart

These files are delivered as a ZIP archive and are intended for use with Adobe Photoshop or similar compositing software.

Get Jason’s base pack and complete tutorial/instructional video set here

View Cart

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That’s No Moon! How to Add the Death Star to your Photos

If you enjoyed my Death Star image post, here’s a quick tutorial on how I did it. All you need is Photoshop and some layer blending prowess. Should Ewoks disable the shield generator, however, you’re on your own to defend it. The same technique works with overlaying images of the moon on cityscapes.

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Finish Strong.

The “Secret Sauce” for Fine-Art Image Processing

Nik Collection plug-ins have been my "secret sauce" for creating images with impact after processing RAW files in Lightroom.
Nik Collection plug-ins are my “secret sauce” for creating images with impact after processing RAW files in Lightroom.

Photography, like any other medium, is a craft. In woodworking, you produce a finished product through a serial application of sandpaper, working from coarse to fine. The best finish is only obtained after using the finest-grit sandpapers, sometimes even between coats of lacquer. So it is, too with photography.

Your camera settings apply the foundation of the image, but they cannot refine the image in the same way your editing software can. Even seemingly small adjustments can be the difference between a snapshot and a gallery print. For years, my “secret sauce” has been to finish images with the “Big 3” Nik Collection plug-ins (Color Efex/HDR Efex/Silver Efex).

For a limited time, my collection of PDF guides to the Nik Collection by Google are available for only $9.99 each. Or, you can purchase the set of three guides for only $24.99. No coupon code necessary!

Each PDF guide is user-printable and also includes a set of installable custom presets for the Nik Collection plug-ins.

Nik Collection PDF Bundle
Includes all three guides listed above

*Special Note: These products contain multiple files and are delivered as a ZIP archive.  To download the files to an iPad, you will need  a free ZIP utility, such as iZip for iOS. Android users should consider using WinZip. Otherwise, download and extract the files to a Mac or PC and then transfer them to your tablet device.

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Expanding Dynamic Range On Single RAW Files in Adobe Lightroom (with Video)

Chicago skyline at sunset, processed using Lightroom and Photoshop to expand dynamic range.
Chicago skyline at sunset, processed using Lightroom and Photoshop to expand dynamic range.

Dynamic range is a way of describing the range of brightness values your digital camera (or film) can faithfully record. Newer cameras, especially the ones from Nikon and Sony, have sensors that deliver as many as 14 stops of dynamic range. The trick, however, is how to extract that information when processing your shots.

If you use Adobe Lightroom, the Camera Profile (under the Camera Calibration Panel) will dictate the starting point for dynamic range. If you use the manufacturer’s RAW converter, then the as-shot settings (e.g., Nikon Picture Control) is applied by default. The in-camera settings set the contrast (tone curve) and color for how your images are processed. By using a low-contrast setting, you’ll be able to expand the dynamic range of your shot. Continue reading Expanding Dynamic Range On Single RAW Files in Adobe Lightroom (with Video)

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Lightroom CC Update: Dehaze Goes Local

Apply the Dehaze effect locally with brush and gradient tools in LR CC 2015.2 and ACR 9.2
Apply the Dehaze effect locally with brush and gradient tools in LR CC 2015.2 and ACR 9.2

Adobe rolled out updates to Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC early today. In addition to new camera/lens profiles, this update adds local Dehaze adjustments to the Develop Module (and ACR 9.2). You can now apply the Dehaze effects locally with brush and gradient tools.

I really like the Dehaze effect; it’s similar to clarity but the contrast adjustment isn’t quite as intense. You can also use it in the negative direction to create the appearance of fog/haze. It’s a tool that is particularly well-suited for enhancing night sky images of the Milky Way.

Adobe has also modified the Import dialog in LR, something I will investigate shortly. In the meantime, enjoy the new features. Note: the Dehaze feature is only available in Lightroom CC 2015 and will not appear in Lightroom 6.

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