Hands-on with the Fujifilm X-T1: First Impressions

The Fujifilm X-T1 is a mirrorless camera with DSLR features (Image courtesy of Fujifim).

The Fujifilm X-T1 is a mirrorless camera with DSLR features (Image courtesy of Fujifim).

Well, I decided I’d see what the hub-bub was all about with regard to the Fujifilm X-series cameras. I’ve known for some time that these cameras have a great sensor (16MP, APS-C, no AA filter), but the ergonomics and performance made me hesitate. The biggest flaws with the Fujifilm X-system have been related to focusing speed and lag. Now, with the introduction of the Fujifilm X-T1, most of those issues are gone.

The X-T1 is more DSLR-like in design than the other Fujifilm bodies, making it a little less compact than say, the X-E2. However, it’s weather-sealed, has an articulating LCD, and the electronic viewfinder (EVF) is huge. Moreover, the autofocus performance is said to be faster than the X-E2, which was considerably better than the previous generations of Fujifilm cameras (X-E1, X-Pro1). The X-T1 shoots at 8fps, and has a nice built-in grip.

So I put in an order with B&H Photo (I buy all my own gear) and got a nice Fujifilm kit. Here’s me unboxing it with my first impressions:

Short answer: the build quality of the X-T1 and lenses is nothing short of dreamy. Silky smooth focus ring action and metal barrel construction. It’s really nice to handle! Moreover,  the size of this kit is totally manageable. My ThinkTank bags just swallow this kit up!

Now that the battery has charged, I’ve had a few hours to play with the camera. I had to run firmware updates on most of the lenses. Here’s the link to Fujifilm’s lens firmware page for reference. Continue reading

Nikon Capture NX-D: The end of Capture NX as we know it

Nikon Capture NX-D: A return to 2004 RAW editing workflow.

Nikon Capture NX-D: A return to 2004 RAW editing workflow. I made this screen capture before the beta software stopped working on my Mac Pro.

Along with the Nikon D4s announcement, Nikon yesterday also announced a long-awaited upgrade to Capture NX2. Called Capture NX-D, this Nikon RAW converter is being offered for download while in beta form. Public beta testing is something Nikon has been reluctant do to in the past, and it’s something I applaud them for. I downloaded the beta of Capture NX-D to see what it would do. Unfortunately, it is clear to me that this new product is more notable for what it lacks than what it offers. Continue reading

The Need For Speed: Compact Flash Card Transfer Analysis

Do you feel the need for speed?

Do you feel the need for speed?

Most of my cameras utilize Compact Flash (CF) cards. When you’re shooting lots of images, or capturing big files (D800), you want to be able to move data quickly. CF cards continue to gain speed (Lexar announced a 3333x CF card this week at CES). I currently have 16GB UDMA 7 CF cards (SanDisk Extreme), but there are faster ones out there if you’re willing to spend the money. While a fast card is certainly going to help you clear your camera buffer faster, I’ve found that the real speed gain comes on the image transfer side.

Continue reading