Category Archives: News

New Release: Photoshop Panel Effects Pack

Create unique three-dimensional panel effects in Photoshop with my custom templates and complete tutorial.

I’m pleased to announce the immediate release of a set of 20 custom panel (triptych/polyptych) effects templates for Photoshop. Along with the panel templates, you also receive a complete PDF guide, Creating Panel Effects in Photoshop and an instructional video companion. My Photoshop Panels Pack works with any version of Adobe Photoshop that supports Channels and Layer masks. Along the way, you’ll learn about creating clipping masks in Photoshop (not a bad skill to have).

The Photoshop Panel Effects Pack includes:

  • Printable PDF eBook with step by-step instructions
  • QuickTime video workshop
  • 20 custom image files to use for panel effects

Creating Panel Effects in Photoshop is available exclusively from Luminescence of Nature Press. 

Share This Story
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Insta Inspiration Presets for Luminar

Replicate the most popular Instagram looks on your DSLR images with the Insta Inspiration preset pack for Luminar by Macphun.

I’m pleased to announce that Macphun has released a custom set of presets that I authored for their Mac image editing software, Luminar. The Insta Inspiration pack of presets gives Mac users a 1-click approach to matching the most popular Instagram looks directly from your own DSLR images.

The Insta Inspiration pack for Luminar includes 30 different effects presets.

Continue reading Insta Inspiration Presets for Luminar

Share This Story
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Color Management 101

Is the color cast in your image something real, or is it an artifact produced by your monitor?
This image is neutral. If it doesn’t look that way, it means your monitor needs profiling.

Updated: Jan 2017

Color is extremely important in photography. Getting accurate color is even more important. With digital photography, you are relying on a monitor to display your images properly so that you can make any necessary corrections and adjustments to brightness, contrast, and color. The problem with computer displays is that they just aren’t accurate. When your computer communicates with your display, it sends a command to generate a particular color value in the RGB universe. The monitor responds in turn by lighting up its phosphors or LCD elements accordingly. But your computer cannot “see” that the actual color produced by your display matches the command it sent. You see, most monitors have inherent flaws that prevent their actual output from matching what the computer told it to produce. What’s more, the human eye has an uncanny ability to compensate for color casts, so if your monitor is a little off, you might not even know it. Continue reading Color Management 101

Share This Story
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail